Matanza – A New Mexico Celebration

In this country there is no better place to find the preservation of the old Spanish ways than New Mexico, as this state is well known for having been isolated hundreds of years by vast rugged distances and warring Indians.

So well preserved are the origins of the American West that even the 15th century “foundation” livestock scarcely available in other parts of the world thrive in New Mexico. You can still find descendants of the rugged, enduring, power house-in-a-small-package Spanish Barb horses, Churra sheep, and Corriente cattle. You can hear cowboy history in the old, spoken Spanish. Although these old vaqueros are increasingly hard to find, there remain a few smaller than average, more rugged than average Onate colony decendents who will speak to you in the 15th century Spanish of the conquistadores preserved through fifteen generations of oral tradition.

Happily, to this day, the romance of wide open western spaces lives on in New Mexico. The Spanish caballero, already sporting a legacy of proud horsemanship even before Columbus’ arrival in North America, saw the first rodeos whenever young vaqueros had some free time, an opportunity to turn work into play, and to show off their skills.

The first American Rodeos which took place in the early 1600’s were conducted by the first American cowboys, the Spanish vaqueros. Two hundred twenty three years before the first easterners arrived in Texas to learn the art of cowboying the vaquero was already a folk hero in New Mexico. He had come to be known as a horseman of great skill and bravery. He was a solid comrade with his fellow vaqueros and a die-hard loyalist to his ranch and it’s brand. He was looked up to by wranglers as a man who could rope anything that moved and ride anything that bucked. He could successfully do just about anything from a saddle. During the time of these first rodeos standardized rules and point systems were developed to determine who would win the vaquero competitions. “Jueces de campo,” or rodeo judges presided over the rodeos to settle ownership disputes and assure that stock were branded correctly. Generally the vaqueros tended the stock on the open range until it was time to sell, brand, or butcher the animals. Anyone of these events required a rounding up of the animals – “al rodear.” This was called a rodeo.

The killing (butchering) of an animal which frequently accompanied a rodeo was called a “matanza.” The first recorded references to a Rodeo in the official republic of the United States are made in old New Mexico family journals.

As matanza researcher Cynthia Martin explains “A traditional Matanza is a family and community-gathering event, with friends and neighbors helping in the labor-intensive job of processing a large pig, goat or sheep”.

“Taking at least an entire day, the process goes from the slaughtering the animal and butchering the meat to cooking the various meat products and preparing what is left for distribution and storage. Of course all those helpers also need to be fed, so the women in the family plan and prepare large amounts of food for the event.”

Today some Matanza celebrations are coming back. They are more in the tradition of Home cooking, Family and friends in the 21st century.

Historically the celebration was done in the winter to prevent spoilage and so the tradition is carried on in the winter today too.

The Hispano Chamber of Commerce in Valencia County New Mexico have begun the tradition again and made it into a fund raising event. Teams compete each year for prizes in the butchering slaughtering and preparation of traditional matanza foods.

Sous Vide BBQ Pork Loin with Adobo – Keto – LCHF

sous vide bbq pork loin

sous vide bbq pork loin

Sous Vide BBQ Pork Loin with Adobo - Keto - LCHF

Sous vide bbq pork loin. This is an easy Sous Vide BBQ recipe that incorporates Adobo seasoning. It also is only 6 hours total including prep and cooking time. There is an up to 12 hours dry brining that is optional but will make your pork loin even more favorable and tender.
Print Recipe
CourseMain Course
CuisineSous Vide
Keywordbarbecue pork loin, pork loin, sous vide
Prep Time30 minutes
Cook Time5 hours 30 minutes
Total Time6 hours
Servings6
Calories649kcal
AuthorWiley

Instructions

  • The pork loin is the area between the shoulder and the back legs of the pig. This meat is very lean and is also the most tender part of the hog. This pork loin was just under six pounds.
    pig loin
  • We will be using an adobo seasoning and besides the fact that it adds a lot of flavor it will also help tenderize the meat by acting as a dry brine. The one I'm using today is from Lowry's and this one also includes pepper. They also have a version without pepper if the pepper is an issue.
    adobo seasoning
  • Get a container. I like using a glass 15-inch by 10-inch rectangular baking dish. Put the seasoned loin into the dish. When seasoning make sure you cover every inch of the pork loin. The salt in the adobo seasoning will play a second role besides taste by acting as a dry brine. Adobo or Adobar in Spanish means marinade, sauce or seasoning. Adobo was employed initially as a method for food preservation but now its primary purpose is just to add a lot of great flavor to your meat. Now put the dish into the refrigerator for up to 12 hours so the loin can get the benefit of the Dry Brine.
    dry brine
  • So what is a Dry Brine? This is when the salt draws out the juices in the meat through osmosis. Next, the salt dissolves into these juices essentially turning into a wet brine even though there isn't any embedded liquid. And finally, this brine is reabsorbed into the meat and starts breaking down tough muscle proteins resulting in a juicy, tender, seasoned meat.
    dry brine
  • Now is the time to put the loin into a vacuum sealed bag using your vacuum sealer. Remove all the air from the bag and seal. if you plan on doing a lot of sous-vide cooking I highly recommend you buy one of these units. The model I bought was well under $100 and it is great for managing your food.
    vacuum sealed pork loin
  • I always double seal each end of the bag just to make sure we get no leaks.
    double seal bag
  • Now it is time for the bath preheat sous-vide bath to 137 degrees Fahrenheit put the pork loin into the bath and then cook pork loin for four hours.
    put into sous vide bath
  • Remove loin from the cooking bag and pat dry the loin with paper towels.
    pat dry pork loin
  • Preheat your smoker or barbecue grill to 275 degrees Fahrenheit if you're using a grill please set up for indirect cooking. Smoke the pork loin for one and a half hours.
    put pork loin into smoker
  • The outcome of this type of cooking gives you the best of both worlds. The meat will be extremely tender and moist. Also, the smoker will add just the right amount of bark, texture, and color.
    finished pork loin

Video

Nutrition

Calories: 649kcal

Barbecue Pork Loin Recipe – Keto – LCHF

pork loin

pork loin

Barbecue Pork Loin Recipe - Keto - LCHF

The loin is the area between the shoulder and back legs and is the leanest, most tender part of the animal. This part of the pig is very lean and does not require long cooking times. Actually, it is the one part that is subject to becoming dry if overcooked.
Print Recipe
CourseMain Course
CuisineAmerican
Keywordbarbecue pork loin, keto, pork loin
Prep Time30 minutes
Cook Time3 hours
Total Time3 hours 30 minutes
Servings8
Calories649kcal

Instructions

  • This one is really easy. The pork loin is one of the leanest and can be the tenderest part of the pig. It also has a tendency to dry out if not cooked properly.
    pork loin diagram
  • First, cover the pork loin with the Killer Hogs rub. Make sure that both sides are fully covered.
    pork loin rub
  • Preheat grill (in indirect cooling mode) or smoker to 250F. I like to use either hickory or oak wood when smoking.
    pre heat grill
  • Put pork loin in the middle of the grill or grate and close the lid.
    loin on grill
  • Check internal meat temperature using a handheld instant-read thermometer every 30 to 60 minutes. When the pork loin reaches 145F (approximate 3 hours) then pull it. Let it rest for about 10 minutes and then slice and serve.
    sliced loin

Video

Nutrition

Calories: 649kcal