Sous Vide BBQ Baby Back Ribs – Keto – LCHF

Sous Vide BBQ Baby Back Ribs

AuthorWiley
DifficultyIntermediate

This recipe is all about how to sous vide baby back ribs. First baby back ribs have nothing to do with baby pigs. They are call baby back for they are shorter than spareribs and are located on the back of the pig. A typical full slab has 11 to 13 bones. This cook we will be doing three racks of baby back ribs that I bought at Sam's Club for $28.52. Or $9.51 a slab.

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Sous Vide BBQ Baby Back Ribs

Yields6 Servings
Prep Time1 hrCook Time13 hrsTotal Time14 hrs

1

This recipe is all about how to sous vide baby back ribs. First baby back ribs have nothing to do with baby pigs. They are call baby back for they are shorter than spareribs and are located on the back of the pig. A typical full slab has 11 to 13 bones. This cook we will be doing three racks of baby back ribs that I bought at Sam's Club for $28.52. Or $9.51 a slab.

pig baby back ribs

2

As always the hardest part of doing ribs is just getting them out of the bag and second, you got to remove the membrane on the back of each rack.

Some people do not see the benefit of removing the membrane but it is actually even more important to remove when cooking sous vide.

The membrane Is going to stop the seasoning from entering the meat. Especially salt that actually helps tenderize the rib meat during the cooking process.

To remove the membrane, I use a butter knife. The duller the better. Get under the membrane at the narrow end of the rack. Using a paper towel grab the end of the membrane and slowly pull.

rib membrane

3

Being pre-diabetic I do not use any rubs that contain sugar. Actually, I prefer rubs that add texture and a little heat without coloring or sweetening the taste of the meat.

This cook I am using Montreal steak seasoning.

If you want to make your own homemade version there is a link to our website showing you how to do it. https://learntobbq.com/recipes/homemade-montreal-steak-seasoning/

In addition, I am using Weber Bold Chipotle to add some heat.

seasoned ribs

4

After applying the rub I then coat the ribs and rub with an oil spray. Use whatever type of oil spray that you like. This one says it is butter flavored but it is not butter. It is just soybean oil. I also use an olive oil spray that works just as well.

spray oil

5

Now flip them over and do it all over again with the seasoning and spray oil.

flip ribs

6

Now we need to get the ribs into the cooking bags. I am using a vacuum sealer but you also use ziplok bags. If you use ziplok bags you will need to cut the racks in half so they can fit.

Also, I bought my vacuum sealer for $80 so you do not need to spend a lot of money on a vacuum sealer. The one I bought was the Gourmia and it is listed above in Cooking Tools but do your own research and buy the one that is best for you.

The secret to putting the ribs into the bag is to let gravity help. Also, I use the 11 inch wide bags.

Hold the bag open in one hand and then grab the ribs from one end and hold directly over the bag.
Slowly lowering the ribs into the bag.

With a little practice, it really is not that hard. Just make sure you try and not rub any of the seasoning off.

ribs in bag

7

Now on to the sealing. Make sure your unit is in regular vacuum and that it is set for moist or liquid mode based on your unit.

I always double seal each end of the bag. Since I have been doing that I have never had a bag failure.

As the air is removed make sure that there are no bubbles and that the bag makes complete contact with the ribs.

Here is what it looks like when they are doubled sealed.

doubled seal

8

Now on to the bath.

Pre-heat your sous vide cooker to 165F.

Then put your ribs into preheated cooker cook them for 12 hours.

You can go to a lower temperature like 145F but you will have to triple the time to 36 hours and have done both times and temperatures I believe the 165F for 12 hours texture is more what I like in a rib.

cook ribs for 12 hours

9

12 hours later remove ribs from cooking bags. Pat dry and then reapply the rub.

Very important to remove the moisture or the rub will absorb it and instead of a nice crust or bark you will have a mushy soft mess.

pat dry ribs

10

Now into a 275F preheated smoker or grill that is set up for indirect cooking. Let the ribs smoke for 1 hour.

ribs in smoker

11

As I cut them it hardly takes any pressure at all. These are very tender ribs.

They also are cooked all the way through but still have a nice pinkest color.

They also have that perfect mahogany color bark.

cut ribs

12

Now the Tug Test.

First bite shows the perfect rib. Firm and not mussy but also extremely tender and the meat easily separates from the bone as you bite in.

Second bite was just as good as the first.

rib bite

13

The ribs from all three slabs were exactly the same.

Usually, when just doing the full cook on the smoker some racks will be better than other.

With sous vide cooking there was not a marginal rib in the bunch.

These baby back ribs are the best I have ever cooked and were actually easier to cook than just using my smoker. Then I usually foil and add liquid halfway through the cook so the ribs will not dry out.

Bon appetite.

finished ribs

Directions

1

This recipe is all about how to sous vide baby back ribs. First baby back ribs have nothing to do with baby pigs. They are call baby back for they are shorter than spareribs and are located on the back of the pig. A typical full slab has 11 to 13 bones. This cook we will be doing three racks of baby back ribs that I bought at Sam's Club for $28.52. Or $9.51 a slab.

pig baby back ribs

2

As always the hardest part of doing ribs is just getting them out of the bag and second, you got to remove the membrane on the back of each rack.

Some people do not see the benefit of removing the membrane but it is actually even more important to remove when cooking sous vide.

The membrane Is going to stop the seasoning from entering the meat. Especially salt that actually helps tenderize the rib meat during the cooking process.

To remove the membrane, I use a butter knife. The duller the better. Get under the membrane at the narrow end of the rack. Using a paper towel grab the end of the membrane and slowly pull.

rib membrane

3

Being pre-diabetic I do not use any rubs that contain sugar. Actually, I prefer rubs that add texture and a little heat without coloring or sweetening the taste of the meat.

This cook I am using Montreal steak seasoning.

If you want to make your own homemade version there is a link to our website showing you how to do it. https://learntobbq.com/recipes/homemade-montreal-steak-seasoning/

In addition, I am using Weber Bold Chipotle to add some heat.

seasoned ribs

4

After applying the rub I then coat the ribs and rub with an oil spray. Use whatever type of oil spray that you like. This one says it is butter flavored but it is not butter. It is just soybean oil. I also use an olive oil spray that works just as well.

spray oil

5

Now flip them over and do it all over again with the seasoning and spray oil.

flip ribs

6

Now we need to get the ribs into the cooking bags. I am using a vacuum sealer but you also use ziplok bags. If you use ziplok bags you will need to cut the racks in half so they can fit.

Also, I bought my vacuum sealer for $80 so you do not need to spend a lot of money on a vacuum sealer. The one I bought was the Gourmia and it is listed above in Cooking Tools but do your own research and buy the one that is best for you.

The secret to putting the ribs into the bag is to let gravity help. Also, I use the 11 inch wide bags.

Hold the bag open in one hand and then grab the ribs from one end and hold directly over the bag.
Slowly lowering the ribs into the bag.

With a little practice, it really is not that hard. Just make sure you try and not rub any of the seasoning off.

ribs in bag

7

Now on to the sealing. Make sure your unit is in regular vacuum and that it is set for moist or liquid mode based on your unit.

I always double seal each end of the bag. Since I have been doing that I have never had a bag failure.

As the air is removed make sure that there are no bubbles and that the bag makes complete contact with the ribs.

Here is what it looks like when they are doubled sealed.

doubled seal

8

Now on to the bath.

Pre-heat your sous vide cooker to 165F.

Then put your ribs into preheated cooker cook them for 12 hours.

You can go to a lower temperature like 145F but you will have to triple the time to 36 hours and have done both times and temperatures I believe the 165F for 12 hours texture is more what I like in a rib.

cook ribs for 12 hours

9

12 hours later remove ribs from cooking bags. Pat dry and then reapply the rub.

Very important to remove the moisture or the rub will absorb it and instead of a nice crust or bark you will have a mushy soft mess.

pat dry ribs

10

Now into a 275F preheated smoker or grill that is set up for indirect cooking. Let the ribs smoke for 1 hour.

ribs in smoker

11

As I cut them it hardly takes any pressure at all. These are very tender ribs.

They also are cooked all the way through but still have a nice pinkest color.

They also have that perfect mahogany color bark.

cut ribs

12

Now the Tug Test.

First bite shows the perfect rib. Firm and not mussy but also extremely tender and the meat easily separates from the bone as you bite in.

Second bite was just as good as the first.

rib bite

13

The ribs from all three slabs were exactly the same.

Usually, when just doing the full cook on the smoker some racks will be better than other.

With sous vide cooking there was not a marginal rib in the bunch.

These baby back ribs are the best I have ever cooked and were actually easier to cook than just using my smoker. Then I usually foil and add liquid halfway through the cook so the ribs will not dry out.

Bon appetite.

finished ribs

Sous Vide BBQ Baby Back Ribs – Keto – LCHF

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